The Sunflowers Are Watching

If you would slowly walk past this piece, you might say it’s a trippy one. It’s  spell is cast by seeming to turn itself inside out to follow your gaze. Or rather, it has two faces on the front, which are entwined symmetrically.

C-_Users_BillJames_Pictures__Art,-mine_2018_Sunflowers_Sunflowers-convergence_Sunflowers_HDR_1200x1200

It’s kind of like this –

JANUS

On my drawing board, its plan looks like this:

Sunflowers drawing board

The whole  piece will be folded from a single piece of printed paper. The upper part (the photo) will be printed on the front, and the pattern below will be printed on the back to guide my blade and my embossing tip.  The four colored shapes only emphasize that the structure is formed of four non-overlapping domains. Each will be folded separately.

This the first kirigami that I’ve done which can be displayed in a shadow-box frame.

(c) William James 2018, all rights reserved.

 

Seen on the Street

Drummer_yaw

Breaking the smooth surface, his head pops out of an upper plane, while several cymbals  pop out of others. An avenue near the top is deeply inset between arcs of step-like folds. Those arcs surround the busker and the viewer, placing us inside of a little urban niche.

All the cut lines are gentle curves, so as to emphasize  the centering effect of the curvilinear perspective, itself the effect of using a wide-angle camera lens. Fold lines always need to be straight in the one-piece kirigami format.

Turning the piece vertically, you would see this:

Drummer_pitch

This work is the second part of my original series (also see Airshow).

This photo ocured in a news report about a band called Urban Funk Machine.

Printed on Red River 80 lb. Luster Card Duo #1986 in an Epson SC-P600.

All rights reserved by William M. James © 2018 .

Imagine that!

This Kirigami is bit of a mechanical puzzle: how can this airy thing be folded up from one piece of paper?  I had found this interesting model on Pinterest:

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As a novice paper folder, I wanted to diagram the underlying architecture of this piece. Once I had grasped its plan, just to make sure that I had really understood it, I added a fourth floater:

cubes_fold_mount_gif

Notice the lines behind it? That’s the blueprint for cutting and folding it. It’s  clearly shown here:

cubes_illustrator_fold_pattern

The pop-up action mechanism is revealed by comparing this diagram to this partially folded state:

cubes_partial-fold_gif

This material is Frosted Gold, Canford Card; I think it would also look cool in sheet brass. The diagram is available from me upon request.

My learning curve has been greatly eased since I’ve started using an extension called Origami in Adobe Illustrator. It simulates folding of the working model (here, the ‘top’ is to the right):

origami_view

It can zoom, tilt and rotate the working model. Mistaken lines in one’s structural diagram are all specifically located, so it is a  great tool for self-directed study.